Carlotta GallThe Wrong Enemy: America in Afghanistan, 2001-2014

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2014

by Banafsheh Madaninejad on October 23, 2014

Carlotta Gall

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Pulitzer-prize winning New York Times reporter Carlotta Gall reported from Afghanistan and Pakistan for almost the entire duration of the American invasion and occupation, beginning shortly after 9/11. In her new book The Wrong Enemy: America in Afghanistan, 2001-2014 (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2014), Gall combines searing personal accounts of battles and betrayals with moving portraits of the ordinary Afghans who endured a terrible war of more than a decade. Her firsthand accounts of Taliban warlords, members of the Pakistani intelligence community, American generals, Afghan politicians, and the many innocents who were caught up in this long war are riveting.  Her evidence that Pakistan protected and fueled the Taliban and protected Osama bin Laden is convincing.

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Sarah Bowen SavantThe New Muslims of Post-Conquest Iran: Tradition, Memory, and Conversion

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[Cross-posted from New Books in Islamic Studies] Sarah Bowen Savant, Associate Professor at the Institute for the Study of Muslim Civilisations at the Aga Khan University in London, addresses important questions about conversion among Persian peoples from the ninth to eleventh century CE in her work The New Muslims of Post-Conquest Iran: Tradition, Memory, and Conversion (Cambridge University Press, 2013). Memory is the [...]

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Joel MigdalShifting Sands: The United States and the Middle East

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[Cross-posted from New Books in World Affairs] Any person who turns on CNN or Fox News today will see that the United States faces a number of critical problems in the Middle East. This reality should surprise few. Stunned by the Al-Qaeda attacks on the Twin Towers in 2001, the George W. Bush administration sent U.S. troops to Afghanistan as part [...]

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Mariam al-AttarIslamic Ethics: Divine Command Theory in Arabo-Islamic Thought

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Nabil MatarHenry Stubbe and the Beginnings of Islam: The Originall & Progress of Mahometanism­

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William ChittickDivine Love: Islamic Literature and the Path to God

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Ovamir Anjum Politics, Law, and Community in Islamic Thought: The Taymiyyan Moment

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[Cross-posted from New Books in Islamic Studies] In Politics, Law, and Community in Islamic Thought: The Taymiyyan Moment (Cambridge University Press, 2012), Ovamir Anjum explores a timely topic, even though his focus is hundreds of years in the past. In order to present his topic Professor Anjum asks a series of foundational questions, such as: How have Muslims understood ideal government [...]

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Ronen ShamirCurrent Flow: The Electrification of Palestine

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John P. TurnerInquisition in Early Islam: The Competition for Political and Religious Authority in the Abbasid Empire

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[Cross-posted from New Books in Islamic Studies] Scholars of Islam and historians have frequently pointed to the Miḥna, translated as ‘trial’ or ‘test,’ as a crossroad in the landscape of Islamic history. Professor John P. Turner of Colby College is among those who challenge the long held assumption that the Miḥna was a uniquely pivotal event in his work Inquisition in Early Islam: [...]

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Brian A. CatlosMuslims of Medieval Latin Christendom, c.1050-1614

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[Cross-posted from New Books in Islamic Studies] In the current political climate it might be easy to assume that Muslims in the ‘West’ have always been viewed in a negative light. However, when we examine the historical relationship between Muslims and their non-Muslim neighbors we find a much more complicated picture. In Muslims of Medieval Latin Christendom, c.1050-1614 (Cambridge [...]

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