James GelvinThe Arab Uprisings: What Everyone Needs to Know

Oxford University Press, 2012

by Jonathan Judaken on August 3, 2015

James Gelvin

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[Cross-posted with permission from Counterpoint with Jonathan Judaken] Professor James Gelvin joins host Jonathan Judaken to discuss the Arab Uprisings, democratization in the Middle-East and Northern Africa, ISIS, al-Qaeda, terrorism, and America's role imposing neo-liberal economic policies in the Middle East that have strongly shaped the political economy of the region.

James Gelvin is Professor of Modern Middle Eastern History at the University of California, Los Angeles. His most recent book is the revised and updated edition of The Arab Uprisings: What Everyone Needs to Know (Oxford University Press, 2012). If you want to be informed about what's going on in the Middle East today, this short, easy-to-read book is the best work out there. For more information on James Gelvin, you can click here to visit his UCLA website.

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